Untitled

ewing_perle_fine.jpg

Title

Untitled

Creator

Perle Fine
American, 1905 - 1988

Perle Fine was born in Boston. After studying art briefly in Boston, Fine moved to New York in the late 1920s and enrolled in the Art Students League, where she studied with Kimon Nicolaides. In 1933, Hans Hofmann opened an art school in New York, across the street from Fine’s studio. During the mid-to-late 1930s, Fine took classes with Hofmann and met some of his other students and later AAA members, Louise Nevelson and Lee Krasner. In 1945, Fine joined the American Abstract Artists, where she met like-minded women and men interested in abstraction.

In May of 1943, two of her paintings were included in Peggy Guggenheim’s Spring Salon, 31 Women, held at Guggenheim’s gallery, Art of This Century. Fine’s first solo exhibition took place at the Willard Gallery in 1945. In 1946, art dealer Karl Nierendorf offered her a place in his gallery, along with a subsidy that enabled her to paint full-time. In 1948, Fine joined the Betty Parsons Gallery, which also represented Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, and Clyfford Still. In addition to having several solo exhibitions at the Betty Parsons Gallery during this period, Fine was included in group exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Museum of Non-Objective Painting, now the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

In 1961, Fine became a visiting lecturer at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, and was an associate professor at Hofstra University, Hempstead, New York, from 1962 to 1973.

Date

1959

Format

mixed media collage, colored paper and pencil on graph paper
8.5 x 11 inches

Type

collage

Source

Ewing Gallery purchase

Collection

Citation

Perle Fine American, 1905 - 1988 Perle Fine was born in Boston. After studying art briefly in Boston, Fine moved to New York in the late 1920s and enrolled in the Art Students League, where she studied with Kimon Nicolaides. In 1933, Hans Hofmann opened an art school in New York, across the street from Fine’s studio. During the mid-to-late 1930s, Fine took classes with Hofmann and met some of his other students and later AAA members, Louise Nevelson and Lee Krasner. In 1945, Fine joined the American Abstract Artists, where she met like-minded women and men interested in abstraction. In May of 1943, two of her paintings were included in Peggy Guggenheim’s Spring Salon, 31 Women, held at Guggenheim’s gallery, Art of This Century. Fine’s first solo exhibition took place at the Willard Gallery in 1945. In 1946, art dealer Karl Nierendorf offered her a place in his gallery, along with a subsidy that enabled her to paint full-time. In 1948, Fine joined the Betty Parsons Gallery, which also represented Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, and Clyfford Still. In addition to having several solo exhibitions at the Betty Parsons Gallery during this period, Fine was included in group exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Museum of Non-Objective Painting, now the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. In 1961, Fine became a visiting lecturer at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, and was an associate professor at Hofstra University, Hempstead, New York, from 1962 to 1973., “Untitled,” Ewing Gallery Permanent Collection, accessed January 29, 2023, https://ewinggallery.omeka.net/items/show/357.

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